DEIB: Embedded or Embodied? At Great Place To Work® companies, they do both.

Rhea Gaddi

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Rhea Gaddi

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In an article on the future of work by the Harvard Business Review, it foresees more companies working towards a stronger integration of Diversity, Equity, Inclusion and Belonging (DEIB) efforts to the business strategy. However, the observed lack of accountability and ownership from leaders appears to be a critical gap that needs to be addressed in order for companies to shift from simply embedding DEIB initiatives into people programs and systems, to guiding employees on how to embody these initiatives as a way of living out the company’s mission, purpose and values in daily life at work.

Our 30+ years of experience working with organizations continue to emphasize that in Great Place To Work® certified companies, trust is a key differentiator for their business. However, we also observed that among the Best WorkplaceTM winners, diversity, equity, inclusion & belonging is a business imperative. Despite a national conversation that is divided on the topic, CEOs at the 100 Best are committed to the principles of diversity and belonging.

More than policies, programs, or headcounts, equitable employers outpace their competitors by respecting the unique needs, perspectives, and potential of their diverse workforce. As a result, diverse and inclusive workplaces earn deeper trust and more commitment from their employees.

“What we have seen companies do to drive the business in the past few years is to refocus on its people, to develop every ounce of human potential in the company,” says Michael Bush, Global CEO, Great Place To Work in his book A Great Place To Work® For All.

DEIB efforts that are aligned with the company’s values, built on trust and supported by leaders, create opportunities to maximize human potential in everyone, motivating them to grow, innovate and help bring the business to greater success.

Here are 4 things we learned from leaders of Best Workplaces:

1. They ensure equity:

Leaders participate in and ensure that people processes cover the different aspects of an employee experience in equitable hiring, pay, promotions, and allocation of development and coaching resources. There are four equities that these leaders consider:

  • Equity of compensation
  • Equity of representation
  • Equity of well-being
  • Equity of opportunity

 

2. They build belonging:

Leaders are intentional in their efforts to make sure that the company’s practices target different people and their unique needs, while making each employee feel valued and central in the company’s culture.

  • Employee Resource Groups are voluntary, employee-led groups that provide support for personal and career development and create a safe space for employees to bring their whole selves to the table.
  • Benefits such as Return To Office programs to support with the transition back to work for mothers returning from maternity leave.
  • Prayer rooms available to people of different faith or religion
  • Culture Awareness Days to educate employees on the different cultures at work and celebrate important holidays together.

 

3. They understand value and use uniqueness.

Leaders understand and value what makes individuals unique, finding ways to meet those unique needs and leverage unique experiences and talents for the betterment of the business.

  • Retired employees rehired as mentors to young or new leaders.
  • Women engineers who volunteer as coaches or mentors to high school girls interested in a career in engineering or technology.
  • Employees with disability give talks at career seminars sharing their career journeys at work.

 

4. They engage and are accountable to drive DEIB in the workplace.

Leaders are engaged and held accountable to hire, develop and promote DEIB at work. When employees have consistent positive experiences of these leadership behaviors, it builds their confidence in the company’s management and leadership and leads to a stronger foundation of trust in the workplace.

  • DEIB metrics such as representation of women in leadership positions across levels.
  • Leaders across levels are equipped with the knowledge, mindset and capabilities to support DEIB through training, coaching and mentoring.
  • Some companies have DEIB committees or councils led by leaders responsible for the development and execution of the company’s DEIB strategy and initiatives.

 

Why it can’t be For Some, but For All:

Having a systematic and continuous way of gathering feedback around the employee experience provides the data and insights needed to create a roadmap for affecting positive change. Gather and analyze your employees’ experience with our tool that combines an employee survey and Great Place To Work Certification™ in one place.

https://greatplacetowork.co.id/employee-survey/ 

Rhea Gaddi

Rhea is a trusted solutions architect who enjoys co-creating with clients their people strategy to transform the vision for their organizations into a reality.  She has 25+ years of experience in leadership, human resources and organization development consulting working with private and public organizations across various industries in the Philippines and ASEAN.  Rhea is a certified Transformative Coach, a mentor to aspiring leaders and an advocate for employee wellbeing. “Every employee has a story and each story matters when it comes to shaping workplace culture. My commitment is to help my clients know these stories and discover its power.”  When off-line, Rhea connects with the environment through long-distance running and recycling bottles and plastic, a personal mission to help save the planet one bottle at a time.

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The data science behind this list from Great Place To Work®

Great Place To Work® has been surveying employees around the world about their workplace experiences for 30 years. We have developed a set of themes and metrics that not only predict whether employees feel their workplace is great, but predict retention, agility, and overall business success.  

Using our proprietary Trust Index™ survey, we measure the core of what we know creates great workplaces — key behaviors that drive trust in management, connection with colleagues, and loyalty to the company.  

The survey enables employees to share confidential quantitative and qualitative feedback about their organization’s culture by responding to 60 statements on a five-point scale and answering two open-ended questions.

Employees tell us whether leaders are accessible, communicate honestly and clearly, and if their actions match their words. They tell us whether they feel respected as individuals, if they receive training benefits, appreciation, support for their well-being and opportunities to contribute. They tell us whether they believe their company is fair related to pay, profits, promotions, recognition, favoritism and opportunities. They tell us if they are proud of their work, their team, and their company, and if they feel they make a difference and their work is meaningful. And they tell us whether they enjoy the people they work with, feel cared for and can be themselves.  

List rankings are based on this employee feedback, which we analyze to determine the extent to which this experience is shared by the full workforce. Great Place To Work measures the differences in survey responses across demographic groups and roles within each organization to assess both the quality and consistency of the employee experience. Statements are weighted according to their relevance in describing the most important aspects of an equitable workplace. 

The best companies create great work experiences not just for management, but also for their part-time employees on the front lines, for those who’ve just joined and those who’ve spent their whole career there, for every race and ethnicity, gender, neurotype, or other demographic in the organization – we look at it all. Companies with the broadest set of employees who report positive workplace experience receive the highest rankings on lists.

In addition to analyzing employee feedback, for National List’s for companies in the Medium and Large size categories, we also consider what a company can tell us about their programs and workplace strategy. Each company also answers six essay questions that provide greater insight into how, and why the organization is great for all people. Responses are rigorously evaluated and cross-reviewed according to Great Place To Work’s research-driven criteria. From what companies share in datapoints and essays, we identify the organizations that offer the most generous, caring and innovative cultures that reflect a genuine commitment to meet the diversity of their people’s needs inside and outside the workplace as validated by what employees themselves report in survey results.
Where an industry list is being revealed (i.e. Healthcare, Technology) additional information provided from an organization in the form of a culture audit will not be considered; rather we analyze employee feedback from the Trust Index survey with the above methodology.

Because employee feedback drives these rankings, surveys must meet strict requirements for how they are distributed and the percentage of employees who respond to ensure they accurately represent honest feedback from the company’s full population. To be eligible for the list, companies must be Great Place To Work Certified™, have 10 or more employees in the country they are being Certified, and be operating in the industry relevant to a specific Industry list if applicable (i.e. Healthcare, Technology). If categories are being listed within a National list, category break downs are as follows: Companies with 10-29 people were considered for the Micro category; those with 30 to 99 people for the Small category; companies with 100 to 999 employees were considered for the Medium category; and those with 1,000 or more for the Large category. Some lists in certain countries may combine categories in which case that will be specified in the list breakdown.
While essay responses provide important context for rankings, only survey data can garner a list placement.

The data science behind this list from Great Place To Work®

Great Place To Work® has been surveying employees around the world about their workplace experiences for 30 years. We have developed a set of themes and metrics that not only predict whether employees feel their workplace is great, but predict retention, agility, and overall business success.  

Using our proprietary Trust Index™ survey, we measure the core of what we know creates great workplaces — key behaviors that drive trust in management, connection with colleagues, and loyalty to the company.  

The survey enables employees to share confidential quantitative and qualitative feedback about their organization’s culture by responding to 60 statements on a five-point scale and answering two open-ended questions.

Employees tell us whether leaders are accessible, communicate honestly and clearly, and if their actions match their words. They tell us whether they feel respected as individuals, if they receive training benefits, appreciation, support for their well-being and opportunities to contribute. They tell us whether they believe their company is fair related to pay, profits, promotions, recognition, favoritism and opportunities. They tell us if they are proud of their work, their team, and their company, and if they feel they make a difference and their work is meaningful. And they tell us whether they enjoy the people they work with, feel cared for and can be themselves.  

List rankings are based on this employee feedback, which we analyze to determine the extent to which this experience is shared by the full workforce. Great Place To Work measures the differences in survey responses across demographic groups and roles within each organization to assess both the quality and consistency of the employee experience. Statements are weighted according to their relevance in describing the most important aspects of an equitable workplace. 

The best companies create great work experiences not just for management, but also for their part-time employees on the front lines, for those who’ve just joined and those who’ve spent their whole career there, for every race and ethnicity, gender, neurotype, or other demographic in the organization – we look at it all. Companies with the broadest set of employees who report positive workplace experience receive the highest rankings on lists.

In addition to analyzing employee feedback, for National List’s for companies in the Medium and Large size categories, we also consider what a company can tell us about their programs and workplace strategy. Each company also answers six essay questions that provide greater insight into how, and why the organization is great for all people. Responses are rigorously evaluated and cross-reviewed according to Great Place To Work’s research-driven criteria. From what companies share in datapoints and essays, we identify the organizations that offer the most generous, caring and innovative cultures that reflect a genuine commitment to meet the diversity of their people’s needs inside and outside the workplace as validated by what employees themselves report in survey results.
Where an industry list is being revealed (i.e. Healthcare, Technology) additional information provided from an organization in the form of a culture audit will not be considered; rather we analyze employee feedback from the Trust Index survey with the above methodology.

Because employee feedback drives these rankings, surveys must meet strict requirements for how they are distributed and the percentage of employees who respond to ensure they accurately represent honest feedback from the company’s full population. To be eligible for the list, companies must be Great Place To Work Certified™, have 10 or more employees in the country they are being Certified, and be operating in the industry relevant to a specific Industry list if applicable (i.e. Healthcare, Technology). If categories are being listed within a National list, category break downs are as follows: Companies with 10-29 people were considered for the Micro category; those with 30 to 99 people for the Small category; companies with 100 to 999 employees were considered for the Medium category; and those with 1,000 or more for the Large category. Some lists in certain countries may combine categories in which case that will be specified in the list breakdown.
While essay responses provide important context for rankings, only survey data can garner a list placement.